Customizing a Default Spree Store, Time Estimates

Customizing a Default Spree Store, Time Estimates

Spree is a great Ruby on Rails e-commerce platform, allowing developers and clients to quickly set up an online store-front. A completely functional store can be built in a relatively short amount of time. Additional customization can commence from there.

Spree comes with a front end theme already installed. This allows a developer to quickly provide a working store with a usable front end. A default Spree store looks like this:

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Building a Schedule with D3

Building a Schedule with D3

The One Acre Cafe, a non-profit community café, recently opened in Johnson City. But due to budget constraints, they’re without software to manage their volunteer staffing.

I thought I would do a simple rails app (live) to try and address this problem. For rendering the calendar, I decided to do it client-side usingD3 . My initial version was in SVG, based on the Calendar View example. The SVG layout relied on static block sizes, so I reimplemented it in HTML.

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Using the Twitter Gem in your Rails Application

Using the Twitter Gem in your Rails Application

Recently, a fellow developer I know expressed his frustrations regarding Twitter’s update to its API. “It seems the days of loading up a simple jQuery to fetch a user’s Tweets are gone,” he lamented. Not to worry, because savvy Ruby on Rails developers can remedy this situation in about 15 minutes while gaining some new functionality “for free.”

Start by opening your Gemfile and adding the Twitter gem.

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How to Integrate Refinery + Rails 3.2 into Your Existing Rails App

How to Integrate Refinery + Rails 3.2 into Your Existing Rails App

Why?

Refinery CMS provides a polished CMS to integrate seamlessly into your existing rails application.

How?

Refinery breaks its components into individual engines and we can pick and choose which engines we want in our application. Refinery’s authentication engine uses devise however we want to have complete control over Devise in our Rails application.

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Discovering Ruby on Rails

Discovering Ruby on Rails

When I started at Synaptian a couple months ago, I had quite honestly never even heard of Ruby or Rails. I had no idea what I was diving into, and as a budding programmer who has always had a distaste for web design, I had no idea why I was accepting an internship that involved using a programming language that was completely foreign to me, and doing something I had already found I didn’t particularly like. I was mostly interested in expanding my portfolio.

What happened still astounds me. I attended a Ruby on Rails bootcamp, run by Nate and Chris, and was given a head start into this new and unfamiliar language. I learned just how helpful and “magical” (a preferred term by enthusiasts!) Rails can be. Typing out or copying the same HTML code over and over was a thing of the past. The concept of DRY is a new favorite of mine. It stands for Don’t Repeat Yourself. Because who wants to do that?

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